New research published by The Journal of Alzheimer's Disease suggests that regular, moderate-intensity exercise may be beneficial in the prevention of the onset of Alzheimer's, even for those people with a genetic predisposition for the disease.

Healthy Body, Healthy Brain

Researchers took a look at glucose metabolism in the brains of study participants who were at high risk and found that people who exercised at a moderate level for more than 60 minutes a day had better glucose metabolism in the areas of the brain associated with Alzheimer's.   They also concluded that sedentary or low-intensity exercise didn't have the same effects on those areas of the brain.

Lead researcher Ozioma Okonkwo, who is an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, notes that this research can be reassuring to anyone, including people at high risk because it gives them an avenue by which to control their inherent risk.   “The evidence shows that it’s never too late to take up and maintain a physically active regimen,” he says. “It also suggests that the earlier you begin and the longer you continue it, the more benefits you tend to accrue.”

To read more about Mr. Okonkwo's research and it's conclusions, please visit this Time article.  And if you're on the hunt for ways to increase your physical exercise, a YesFit challenge may be just the thing you're looking for!

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